History
Akwamu Regal List

Akwamu Regal List:  1505-1937

Otumfuo Agyen Kokobo
Otumfuo Ofosu Kwabi
Otumfuo Oduro
Otumfuo Addow
Otumfuo Akoto I
Otumfuo Asare
Otumfuo Akotia
Otumfuo Obuoko Dako
Ohemmaa Afrakoma
Otumfuo Ansa Sasraku I
Otumfuo Ansa Sasraku II
Otumfuo Ansa Sasraku III
Otumfuo Ansa Sasraku IV (Addo)
Otumfuo Akonno Panyin
Otumfuo Ansa Kwao
Otumfuo Akonno Kuma (Regent)
Otumfuo Opoku Kuma
Otumfuo Darko Yaw Panyin
Otumfuo Akoto Panyin    
Otumfuo Dako Yaw Kuma
Otumfuo Kwafo Akoto I (Okorforboo)
Otumfuo Akoto Ababio (Kwame Kenseng)
Otumfuo Akoto Ababio II (Okra Akoto)
Otumfuo Akoto Kwadwo (Mensa Wood)
Otumfuo Akoto Ababio III (Emml Asare)
Otumfuo Ansa Sasraku V (Kwabena Dapaa)
Otumfuo Akoto Ababio IV (Emml Asare)
Nana Kwafo Akoto II (Kwame Ofei)
1505-1520
1520-1535
1535-1550
1550-1565
1565-1580
1580-1595
1595-1610
1610-1625
1625-1640
1640-1674
1674-1689
1689-1699
1699-1702
1702-1725
1725-1730
1730-1744
1744-1747
1747-1781
1781-1835
1835-1866
1866-1882
1882-1887
1887-1909
1909-1910
1910-1917
1917-1921
1921-1937
1937-1992


 
Akwamu Stood Up Against Europeans for Liberty

A new discovery which gives credence to the Akwamus freedom or liberation struggles was made known to the Akwamu Traditional Council and the Ghana National Monuments and Museums Board by a Norwegian Maritime Museum research team in recent years.  One Mr. Leif was the discoverer (diver) and head of the team.  The historical fact is that in 1768, a Norwegian ship called “Fredenshborg” carrying spices from the Far East landed at the shores of the Gold Coast and received some slaves.  On the journey, the Akwamu nationals on board the vessel tried to take over the ship.  In the ensuing struggle for their liberty, the vessel was wrecked around Copenhagen.  Parts of the artifacts and ornaments found on the vessel have been deposited at Akwamufie.

 


 

 
Asamani

asamani statue

Another person whose life and career present many interesting facets was Asomani (Asemmani) of Akwamu. Said to have been first employed as a cook in the English forts at Accra,'after learning the 'white man's ways' he established himself as a trader at Accra, and acted as a broker for Akwamu traders who came there to trade with the Danes in Christiansburg, Later on Asomani was chosen to carry out Akwamu's revenge on the Danes. After successfully executing his orders he became the Akwamu Governor of the castle in 1693. Akwamu-Danish estrangement had started at the end of the 1670s when the latter assisted the Accra to foil an Akwamu attack on them. The Danes were never forgiven by the Akwamu; and in 1693 Asomani, who was familiar with their strength and weakness, led a group of eighty Akwamu men into the castle. The Akwamu deceived the Danes into believing that they had come to purchase firearms. By a clever ruse they were able to load the guns with bullets which had been "concealed in the folds of their cloths’. Their guns were quickly turned on the Danes, who soon surrendered; the Danish Governor escaped, but his less fortunate countrymen were led captives to Akwamu.

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Asamankese

Asamankese

 
Dormaa

The History of Dormaa and the Akwamu Connection

dormapr3The Dormaa people are of the Aduana clan and were originally part of the Akwamu Kingdom during the 17th Century.. The Akwamu people, currently live near the Volta River where the Akosombo Hydro-electric Dam is located . According to oral history in about 1600 after the death of Nana Sasraku, the then Akwamuhene, a serious dispute arose over the election of his successor. Most of the Kingmakers had chosen one of the princes to succeed him, but he did not win the support of the Queenmother and a section of the stool elders (the Kingmakers). For sometime, it was not possible to install a new chief. Consequently, a civil war nearly broke out. In a bid to avoid any possible strife, a section of the elders of the Adonten Division in consolations with the Queen mother - Nana Mpobi Yaa decided to leave Akwammu. A great number of the people including some of the royals followed the Queenmother.

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